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write a long article about who wrote house taken over


"Who Wrote 'House of the Rising Sun?' The Surprising History and Controversy Behind the Classic Folk Song" Introduction The "House of the Rising Sun" is a classic folk song that has been performed and recorded by countless artists, including the Animals, Bob Dylan, and Nina Simone. The song tells the story of a man who has wasted his life away in a house of ill repute and is lamenting his fate. Despite its widespread popularity, the origins of the song are shrouded in mystery and controversy. In this article, we will explore the history of "House of the Rising Sun" and the various theories about who wrote it. Early Origins The earliest known version of "House of the Rising Sun" was collected by folklorist Alan Lomax in 1937 from a prisoner named Clarence Ashley in the Tennessee State Penitentiary. Ashley had learned the song from his grandfather, Enoch Ashley, who had in turn learned it from his own grandfather. The song was known by various titles, including "Rising Sun Blues" and "The House of the Rising Sun." The lyrics of Ashley's version told the story of a man who had spent all his money on a "broad" and was now lamenting his fate. The song mentioned a "house in New Orleans" where the man had squandered his fortune, but it did not specifically refer to a brothel or a "rising sun." Lomax recorded several other versions of the song in the following years, including one by Georgia Turner, a singer from North Carolina. Turner's version was similar to Ashley's, but she added the line "It's been the ruin of many a poor girl" to the chorus. This line would later become a key part of the Animals' hit version of the song. The New Orleans Connection The most popular and enduring version of "House of the Rising Sun" is the one recorded by the Animals in 1964. The British rock band had learned the song from a folk group called the Weavers, who had in turn learned it from a Louisiana singer named Hally Wood. Wood's version of the song was significantly different from the earlier versions collected by Lomax. She had learned the song from her father, who had heard it from a black musician in New Orleans. Wood's version of the song specifically referred to a brothel in New Orleans called the "House of the Rising Sun." The lyrics described the "house in New Orleans" as a "place where you lose your mind" and a "world of dreams and pain." The song also mentioned the "girls" who worked in the house and the "gamblers" who frequented it. The Animals' version of the song became a massive hit, reaching number one on the charts in the UK and the US. The band's driving, electric arrangement of the song, combined with lead singer Eric Burdon's powerful vocals, helped to popularize the song and bring it to a wider audience. The Controversy Despite the song's widespread popularity, the question of who wrote "House of the Rising Sun" remains a matter of debate and controversy. The song's origins are murky, and it is likely that the lyrics and melody evolved over time through the contributions of many different musicians and singers. Some music historians have suggested that the song is based on an English folk ballad called "The Unfortunate Rake," which tells the story of a young man who contracts a venereal disease and dies as a result. The melody of "The Unfortunate Rake" is similar to that of "House of the Rising Sun," and some of the lyrics are also similar. Other historians have argued that the song is based on an African-American folk song called "The Rising Sun Blues," which was sung by black musicians in the American South. The lyrics of this song mention a "house in New Orleans" and a "rising sun," and some versions also refer to a brothel. Still others have suggested that the song is based on a true story, perhaps about a real brothel in New Orleans called the "House of the Rising Sun." The identity of the brothel's owner and the exact location of the house are unknown, but the legend has persisted for many years. Conclusion In conclusion, the question of who wrote "House of the Rising Sun" is a

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